Honda CRX Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,985 Posts
That's a really good question. I've seen it asked a number of times, and there hasn't been a really good answer.

The 88s do have different lower control arms on the rear; they are either the same as or the same type as that used on the Integra Type R. The shock mounts are different than the later years of CRX. I don't think that accounts for the "passive rear steer" (or rather, dynamic toe angle changes) so there may be other differences as well. Possibly the exact mounting point, or the compensator arm, are different.

--DD
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,562 Posts
The key difference is in the body-side mounting point of the compensator (toe) arm, at the forward end of the rear trailing arm. It creates an aggressive toe curve that causes that "passive" rear steering that everyone talks about. Changing the trailing arms or swapping the brakes can do nothing to alter that geometry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
jfrolang said:
The key difference is in the body-side mounting point of the compensator (toe) arm, at the forward end of the rear trailing arm. It creates an aggressive toe curve that causes that "passive" rear steering that everyone talks about. Changing the trailing arms or swapping the brakes can do nothing to alter that geometry.
Perfect, that is exactly what I was looking for. I didn't want to loose that if I changed over to disk brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Ahh, so its the forward trailing arm mounting point? Thanks for the info.

Are you familiar with just how much dynamic toe it creates? I think i saw someone on honda tech post up he had -.015 toe out under compression of 2 inches or so.... i'll have to find the thread. He had an EF civic and i believe it was a 91.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Both the camber and tow change under turning with our trailing arm. If you look at it under the assumption that the trailing arm bushing doesnt "move" (yes it does of course), as you make a left turn, the left traling arm would thus go "down" and the right trailing arm go "up". Which means given your ride height, from a stock car, your left wheelbase as a whole sort of shortens on that side.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top