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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Hygrometer/Thermometer that I have mounted to the main vents of my AC. The sensor is directly over the flow of air. I did this because I not only wanted to test the effectiveness of DuraCool vs. R134a, but also wanted to test the general condition of my AC. I plan to put a second unit near wherever the recirc air intake is if someone could tell me (near the floor?)

I believe that conventional wisdom is that the AC works on about a delta of 20F degrees. Meaning, that with recirculating air, it is able to cool it 20F over the air that enters the system. Can anyone find the spec for the factory air delta? I would like to know exactly what I should be expecting.

So far, with outside temps conveniently hovering at around 100F, I should have a stable heat gain inside from the environment.

So far, the AC is getting vent temps down to about 60F after 15 to 30 minutes of driving beginning with an internal temp of about 105F (parked in shade). Without the second unit, I do not have the corresponding intake temp to calculate the delta. So I really don't know if 60F is decent or not.

The actual car temp will be also be affected by the amount of air recirculated, which I think may be a little low. I have to charge up the second rex this week and see how well its fan blows to compare.

Any opinions or comments?
 

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believe me about that brondband i used to have 3 mb or something and now i have 28800 kb or something i was told its worse then dial up who would of know there was something slower then that?
 

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Well, the best i have ever done, is bench tested my R134-a and was able to pull 32 degrees vent temp parked in my garage, with an external fan blowing into my condensor, idleing at about 1200rpm.

on average, my 134a system blows between 40-50F.

Things I am curious about on duracool, how cold does it get at idle? my 134a warms about 10-15 degrees after about a minute sitting at a stoplight on a hot day.

Also, how much of a drag is it on the engine? at idle, my car drops to about 400rpm using the Panasonic compressor.

-Henry
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
djhankb said:
Things I am curious about on duracool, how cold does it get at idle? my 134a warms about 10-15 degrees after about a minute sitting at a stoplight on a hot day.
I'll have to change to Duracool and retest. It is supposed to be significantly better than R134a and marginally better than R12.

I usually idle the car to 1200 RPMs and the AC works a bit better while I wait for my wife.

djhankb said:
Also, how much of a drag is it on the engine? at idle, my car drops to about 400rpm using the Panasonic compressor.
"Panasonic"? Must be some aftermarket compressor. I think there was only a Sanden or Mitsu..something. My idle does not change. Seems like it compensates for when the compressor kicks in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So glad they are looking out for me. :rolleyes1: I am doing it anyway. I'll file this law in the same place as the speed limit.

Your Friends at the US EPA said:
Is It Legal to Replace HFC-134a with HC-12a®, Duracool 12a, or OZ-12®; under the SNAP Regulations?

Under EPA's Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program, it is illegal to replace CFC-12 with HC-12a® in any type of air conditioning system, including car and truck air conditioners. Similarly, it is illegal to replace CFC-12 with HC-12a in any refrigeration system with the single exception of industrial process refrigeration.

The question of the legality of replacing HFC-134a with HC-12a® is generally asked in reference to a procedure where CFC-12 is removed from a car or truck air conditioner, HFC-134a is charged into the system and then immediately removed, and HC-12a® is then charged into the system. This procedure is referred to as a "sham retrofit" and is illegal. Regardless of how long the vehicle contains HFC-134a, if it arrives at a shop containing CFC-12 and leaves containing HC-12a®, that is clearly an illegal sham retrofit. Other than this case, EPA and hotline staff cannot determine the legality of replacing HFC-134a with HC-12a® based solely on a phone call or letter. Rather, the determination depends on many factors, including the nature of the retrofit from CFC-12 to HFC-134a, the reason for the retrofit, and the exact procedure and timing involved.

If, despite this information, you plan to change a car from HFC-134a to HC-12a®, you should consider the following:

1. The following 17 states ban the use of flammable refrigerants like HC-12a in motor vehicle air conditioning, regardless of the original refrigerant: Arkansas, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin, Washington, and the District of Columbia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oh, Duracool and similar propane products use a much lower high side pressure which should make things easier on your compressor -- especially if it was originally designed for R12.
 
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