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Awhile back I lowered my car with Koni/GC a conservative 1.5". Since then I've replaced axles, a ball joint, and inner and outer tie rods. I still have bushings on my agenda (still debating the Honda vs. Mugen vs. ES thing). Recently I've noticed wear on inner edges of my tires. They're relatively new Yokohama AVS so I've got to do something. Here are my questions -

1. Do I need a camber kit? I know I need an alignment. I've just kept putting it off because I keep working on my suspension but now I have to do it. According to some posters on HT if I have a alignment and the toe is set close to zero as possible I won't need a camber kit, true or not?

2. Which kit? Each kit seems to have big tradeoffs - the arm bushing replacement type are cheap, seem relatively easy to intall, but notorious for slipping. Adjustable balljoints are expensive, harder to install, and raise the upper arm so much it can hit the fenderwell. Adjustable arms are expensive, but are longer so some people say they hit inner fender lip. What are you using and it's pros and cons?

3. The rear....how many washers for a conservative 1.5" (or so drop)?
 

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When lowering a Honda, MY personal rule of thumb has ALWAYS been to get a camber kit. Do everything in one shot, install lowering suspension, camber kit and have it aligned ASAP! I would not lower my car without a camber kit.
In the long run, it saves on the tires.
Just my personal experience and never have had any tire/alignment problems.
I have gone with the the arm bushing replacement type for both the front and rear. Maybe i am lucky, but i never had any problems.
 

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My rule of thumb has to never get a camber kit. What you are experienceing is almost defintely toe wear, if you have not had the car aligned. To be completely honest, I have adjustable upper links in the rear because at the height im at, I wanted more negative camber.

As I (and many others will probably chime in here) have said and experienced in the past it almost all abnormal tire wear comes from toe.

Case in point, my current tires on my crx are getting long in the tooth, have had aggressive camber their whole life, and are worn completely evenly. My toe is dead nuts 0 and my caster is just slightly + in the front for incresed traction.

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I dont know if its much of a debate.....theres a wide range of acceptable camber. By 'correcting' it back to oem spec, you are losing a portion of the performance benefit you had gained by lowering the car in return for a slightly higher (if any) tire life.

Toe on the other hand, in pretty much all situations, should be set to 0 all the way around. I dont think theres any debate on that, and Im sure if he hasnt had his car aligned since it was dropped that toe is causing his tire wear.

You can look at any car and see the same thing. I run a ton more static - camber on the subaru then on the crx, due to the front ends tendency to go + camber wise in hard turns, and tire wear is completely normal when toe is in spec.

Especially with a 1.5" drop, how much - camber could there possibly be?

Anyway, take that thing in, get it aligned as much as possible with the factory adjustments and i assure you your tire wear problems will be a thing of the past.

If you dial out the camber, you are dialing out one of the key performance benefites of a lowered suspension, especially one as good as yours!

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yeah, no debate here.

you dont get a camber kit to correct tire wear. thats not the problem.

its toe. fix toe with an alignment and you can run whatever camber you want.

get a camber kit to adjust camber for performance reasons. racers get camber kits to get MORE negative camber. but realize that whenever you adjust camber, you change toe. which needs another alignment to correct...

suspension is DESIGNED to have a change in camber, to the negative when loaded. with stiffer springs, its loaded travel is less and will get less of a camber change. so thats why you need to start off with more camber. better yet, just leave it where it is at your final drop height and forget the camber kit.

for those of you who SWEAR by getting a camber kit, think of this. the FACT is that when changing camber positive, it brings the toe closer back to spec, or straighter. thats why you see better tire wear results. but its not the camber change thats solved it, its the toe change. your end result now with getting rid of negative camber may be less tire wear because of the toe change, but now you got less grip in the turns.

the only reason youd want straight up camber is for straight line grip, like drag racing. thats it.
 

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You're seeing problems from replacing the tie rods and not getting it aligned afterward. This same thing happened to me. I reset the tie rods to the same spot (surface rust markers rule!) but when I went in to get it aligned, it had been off from before. And thats why I went through a set of azenis in 3 months... right to the cords.
 

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Chiming in also.
95% toe-out wear, maybe 5% camber wear.

Something I just thought of, for all those that swear that camber is the cause of such inner tire wear try this: adjust your car where you have a few degrees of toe-IN and see what part of the tire wears really quick..... the outside, no matter what your camber.
 
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