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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
UPDATED!!! Scroll down for the latest, more complete version!

There have been a lot of questions regarding engine swaps lately, so I thought I would write an article outlining each one, with costs, and make it a sticky. I have all the info I need for D and H series swaps, but I need some details on B and K swaps. I don't need to know the dirty details about banging out a hole for the alternator and stuff, but I'd like to get the costs and wiring details down. Please don't tell me you paid 300 bucks for your b16 from a buddy, really I want the typical cost so people will know what to expect when they get into it. Also if someone can help me out with the differences in the B engines for parts compatibility that would be great. I'm not going to include LS/VTEC or CRVTEC right now, because I think that if someone comes on asking what swap they should do, they probably don't have the skill to put a good reliable one together right.

Here's a start for a list:

D series:
A6 for non-Si (with MPFI)
Mini-Me
DOHC ZC
Z6/D15b/Y8

B series:
B16 (cable and hydro)
B18A/B
B18C*

Kseries
K20A

H series
H22A*
H23 (?)

Post here or PM me some stuff, info or links, I know a few people, myself included, have already written articles on various swaps. I'd like to set it up so that there's a basic description of each swap, including what it costs, what you need for it, what kind of work it involves etc, and then have a link or two to a more detailed article. It would be cool to rate them all too based on cost/power/work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here's what I have started on so far, to give you an idea of the format. I need specs and prices mostly, I'm going off what I know and using hp/tq numbers from here. I'd prefer links to be threads on here, so we know they will always be there. I linked to Effin for the MPFI article because I didn't know of one on here offhand, but feel free to give me one or make a nice write up for it.

removed with update
 

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Here's a link for the auto-manual info.

Reading what you've got so far reminds me of another reason I love my CRX: The engine swap choices are seemingly endless. Other cars give you one or maybe 2 engines to choose from when you want to swap, but a CRX is practically limitless. Even aside from the numerous stock engines out there that can work, there's hybrid swaps like LS/VTEC, and parts swapping like the aforementioned Y8 intake manifold. I love it. :p
 

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I found that website doesn't have all the info you need to do the swap. It has alot of it, but a better write up should be made. I wish I took pictures during my last conversion so I could of showed everything.
 

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jfrolang said:
Here's a link for the auto-manual info.
As I've probably said in other threads, there's a few things that writeup leaves out.
First, the rear mount is different between M/T and A/T... The writeup just tells you to move the A/T mount over, when really it should be replaced with the proper M/T mount.
Second, the interlock wiring. The writeup says you need to connect two pins on the shifter switch connector or else you won't be able to remove the key. Using the writeup's solution, the P indicator in the instrument cluster will be on all the time. In reality, all you need to do is unplug the blue interlock control unit under the driver's seat. The interlock control unit handles the switch and solenoid in the ignition switch assembly and a solenoid in the now non-existant shifter console... There's no use for the ICU in an M/T car.
Third, if you want to include the OEM clutch-start features, you should install a 40-amp automotive relay on the heavy blk/wht wires that the writeup tells you to jump. The relay's normally open contacts would be on the heavy wires, one side of the coil would be tapped into the starter switch signal (the heavy blk/wht wire that shows power when the ignition is switched to start) and the remaining side would be grounded through the clutch interlock switch at the top of the pedal cluster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok I'm working on the B series stuff right now. I'm grouping the B16A family together like this:

removed with update

I have actually never done a B16 swap, and I don't know much about the B16A motors, so if someone can help me out with all the different versions that would be great. I included those three so far so that there's one cable, one OBD1 hydro, and one USDM.

I'm going to go ahead now and add the B16B and B17, and then the LS motors and GSR and finally the type-R. If there's anything special about each swap let me know, I'm a bit in the dark when it gets down to the specifics of the B series swaps.
 

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downest said:
B16A2
Found in: 92-95 Del Sol VTEC, 99-00 Civic Si (USDM)
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: ?
Just a little clarification, the B16A2 was found in the 96-97 Del Sol VTEC, and the 99-00 Civic Si. The 94-95 Del Sol VTEC had a B16A3. They're fairly identical AFAIK, just OBD-1 vs. OBD-2. There was no B16 Del Sol in 92 or 93. (No Del Sol at all in 92). The OBD-2 engines used a P2T ECU.

Don't forget the B20s!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I got a PM about the D16A1, I'll post it here so everyone that doesn't know can read it before someone tries to sell you one...

downest said:
No problem at all man. I prefer to put this in posts so other people can read it, if you don't mind I'll add it to the engine thread.

To answer your question, that engine will not work in your second gen CRX without some fabrication of motor mounts. It's not really worth the time, if you want a cheap DOHC look for a DOHC ZC. It will work in a first gen CRX though, it's a popular swap for them.

Venomz said:
In your article about the D-Series, which was very interesting, I did not see any information for this engine, a D16A1. I have a chance to pick up one along with the tranny and ECU for it for 250 dollars.

If I am to understand correctly, I should be able to just bolt it all up. Then I will have to modify the wiring harness and I should be ready to go. MPFI should be in this package was well, shouldn't it, since I'm purchasing the ECU along with it all?

Is this correct, and, is it worth it? I have a 1990 DX, by the way.
 

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downest said:
Come on guys, I need some more info! I know a LOT of people have done B swaps.
B18A
Found in: 90-91 Integra (92-93 versions are also available, but they are OBD-1)
Power: 130 hp
Stock ECU: PR4 (OBD-0)
Estimated Cost: $800

B18B
Found in: 94-01 Integra
Power: 140 hp, 127 tq
Stock ECU: P74 (94-95 OBD-1) P75 (96-01 OBD-2)
Estimated Cost: $1500

B17A
Found in: 92-93 Integra GS-R
Power: 160 hp
Stock ECU: P61 (OBD-1)
Estimated Cost: $2000
Note: This is a rare, hard to find engine.

B16B (JDM)
Found in: 98-01 Civic Type R
Power: 185 hp, 117 tq
Stock ECU: PCT (OBD-1)
Estimated Cost: $3700

B18C1
Found in: 94-01 Integra GS-R
Power: 170 hp, 121 tq
Stock ECU: P72 (OBD-1 and 2 versions available)
Estimated Cost: $2800

B18C5
Found in: 97-01 Integra Type R
Power: 195 hp, 130 tq
Stock ECU: P73 (OBD-2)
Estimated Cost: $4500

B18C (JDM) Blacktop
Found in: 94-01 Integra SiR-G
Power: 180 hp, 126 tq
Stock ECU: P72-J (OBD-1)
Estimated Cost: $3200

B18C (JDM) Redtop
Found in: 96-01 Integra Type R
Power: 200 hp (96-97) 205 hp(98-01) 134 tq
Stock ECU: P73-J (OBD-1)
Estimated Cost: $4000 (96-97) $4500 (98-01)

B20B/Z
Found in: 97-01 CR-V
Power 126 hp (97-98) 146 hp (99-01) 133 tq
Stock ECU: P75? (OBD-2)
Estimated Cost: $1000

B20A, B21A
Found in: 89-91 Preludes
These engines are not suitable for CRX swaps, the mounts and transmission bolt patterns are different from other B-series engines.
 

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B18C3
Found in: Replacement shortblock
Power: Dependant on application
Stock ECU: P72 or P73
Estimated Cost: Dependant on application

B18C4 (EDM)
Found in: 98-2000 Civic aerodeck 1.8 VTi (5-door)
Power: 185 hp, 130 tq
Stock ECU: P72 (OBD-1 or OBD-2 dependant on date fabricated)
Estimated Cost: $3500

B18C6 (EDM)
Found in: 97-01 Integra Type R
Power: 190 hp, 130 tq
Stock ECU: P73 (OBD-2)
Estimated Cost: $4500
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ok I updated a lot of it and added all the B series motors in to the best of my ability. I'm working on the H and K series next, but they shouldn't take nearly as long, there are a lot of B motors! I still need a bunch of missing info, and maybe an MPFI swap article that's hosted on this site. If you have time, or you're bored or whatever, please read through and post up corrections, namely with missing info, pricing, and the little nuances of swaps that I've left out.

Here's the entire thing as it is now, making progress!

removed with update
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Another update, removed the old ones to save length and avoid confusion. I think all the motors are in there now (all the relevant ones anyway). I need prices and ECUs on them mostly, as well as the details on the K20 series at the end. I looked around but found a lot of conflicting stuff so I'll leave it to someone who knows. I'd also like articles for the H and K swaps hosted on here so we know the links are always going to be there.

If anyone has pictures of a particular swap in a car, send them to me. I already have a couple of my A6 and my Y8 for the D, but a nice clean DOHC ZC, a B16, B18A/B, B18C, H22 (maybe one with h2b one without), and K20 would be nice. Let's try to keep them as stock as possible (ie no elaborate turbo setups). Please don't send me a million pics, just one of your engine bay from the front, like this:



not this:


The idea is to show the motors, as they would appear in a swapped CRX. If you want me to look at all your other pics post them on the board or submit them for the Featured CRX article.

Here's the text:
One of the most common questions on CRX and Honda internet boards all over is "what's the best swap for me?" There is no answer to this vague question, but if you know what you're looking for from the engine, how much you can spend, and how much work you can do yourself, you can narrow it down a bit. Here I'll try to outline what you'll need for each option and give some links to more specific info about each one.

Chassis-Specific Notes
There are a couple of little things you need to know/do with the DX and HF models. If you have an Si you're pretty much all set to swap.

The HF has little tiny axles and hubs/brakes. It is recommended that you swap them out for at least CRX Si hubs and brakes. The HF axles will work with other D series transmissions (DOHC ZC aside) because they have the same inner size and spline count, but if you're pulling the axles out anyway, you might as well do yourself a favour and swap the hubs.
With the HF, you also will need to do some minor rewiring to use the FICSV on OBD0 manifolds like the one on the D16A6. Matt Miner provided this information when I did an A6 swap into an HF:

Next is the fast idle control solenoid valve (FICSV), which is mounted on the back of the Si intake plenum, near the EACV. Its plug uses 2 wires: black/yellow and blue. Black/Yellow (later referred to as B/Y) is a 12V + and routes to the B/Y from the EACV plug. The blue wire goes to pin B2 on the ECU. B2 is currently connected to the green/yellow wire from the "shift up light" in the gauge cluster. The plug for this wire contains a green/orange and a yellow/red wire. It is under the driver's side of the dash, connected alongside the fusebox with a white plug. Cut the green/yellow wire from the plug on the harness and splice in the blue wire from the fast idle control solenoid valve, with the new wire going toward the ECU. Don't connect the FICSV wire to the plug under the dash, or weird stuff will happen with your shift light! The "shift up" light is now disconnected (YAAAAAA!!!) and the green/yellow wire on the plug under the dash now hangs bare. FICSV wiring is now complete.
The DX fortunately doesn't need new hubs, so you can put your pickle fork away. It does need some re-wiring however. You need to ditch the fake carb DPFI setup and rewire to MPFI for every worthwhile swap out there. MPFI wiring isn't that bad, basically you are wiring for 4 injectors, and a new distributor. If you are going to convert to OBD1, this would be a good time to do it as you can wire your harness for a different distributor now. Here's the MPFI swap from Effin Motorworks. Once you get that done you're all set...
Unless you have an automatic DX! A few members here have done the automatic to manual conversion, it's not very hard to do. Here's one article about how to do it.

OBD1 conversion
For a majority of swaps, you'll want to convert to OBD1. Not only is it the best way to use the VTEC offered by most Honda motors, but it also offers much better tuning capabilities. You will need to get an OBD1 ECU, usually a P28 or P72, which will cost between $50 and $200. Plan to spend a little more if you want a chipped ECU over a stock one, a good idea if you're going to be tuning the new motor for aftermarket parts. You will also need a conversion harness to plug the OBD1 ECU into your OBD0 harness, which costs around $100 commercially from RyWire or similar company. You can also make your own harness for a lot less (possibly free), or find a member who can make one for you (I make them).
You will need an OBD1 or OBD2 distributor also. Either will work, as long as it's wired in correctly. This means that you will need either a conversion harness for the distributor, or you need to rewire your car's harness for the new one. If you didn't get one with the engine, you can get one anywhere from $50 (used) to around $200 (new).
You also need to add wiring for a 4-wire oxygen sensor. Autozone and other parts stores sell a Bosch universal 4-wire sensor for around ~$60. Another option is to wire in a wideband O2 sensor like the Innovate LC-1, which will cost about $200. This is a must if you plan on tuning the engine in the future.
Here is an article I wrote which includes how to convert to OBD1, in this case for a mini-me.

Notes on Used Engines
You're buying a used engine, whether it came out of someone else's car or from a JDM junkyard. If you haven't seen it run, I strongly suggest rebuilding it. This means new rings and bearings, all new seals top and bottom end, valve lapping at the least, new headgasket, rod bolts, head bolts/studs, timing belt, and water pump. Do this all while the motor is out of the car and you'll save yourself a lot of trouble later on. If you rebuild it, you know everything in the motor is new and won't die on you, and you can beat on it regularly without worry. Just because you bought it with "only 40 thousand miles" from an importer doesn't mean it's fresh. It went to the junkyard in Japan for some reason. I've seen motors from importers that work perfectly, and others that have more than their share of problems.
Try to get as much as you can with the motor. By this I mean the alternator, manifolds, distributor, everything that's attached to it. This will save you on parts, even if you only need them for a core return down the road. In some cases (D series) you can use your stock CRX Si parts fine, but the newer engines have better one (the Y8 intake manifold for example).
Plan to drop $300-$400 on a quality rebuild, if you're doing it yourself. That estimate might be a little high, but it's better to be under budget at the end of the day.

Miscellaneous Stuff About Swaps
First off, there are definitely going to be unforseen costs, this is especially true with used motors. Remember that you need to buy oil and coolant, new filters, you might lose a part or break something. You also may need to rent a hoist if you're DIYing it.
I recommend doing it yourself rather than paying a shop if you have time. Don't expect your first swap to be done in an afternoon. It might, but don't plan on it. It's definitely a good learning experience, and it's fun to boot. There are very few long time CRX owners who haven't swapped a motor before, or at least helped with a swap. Once you've done it a few times, it will still take a couple of hours.
Get some friends to help you out the first time. It's not necessary, but it's a lot easier, and it's a lot safer too. If you don't have anybody that wants to help you, see if there are members on the board that are local. There are plenty of us that are willing to give a few hours to help a fellow rexer. You'll definitely save a lot of cash swapping it yourself, even after the cost of beer and food for your friends.

D-Series
This category will be the easiest and usually the cheapest swap for most enthusiasts. If you have an Si, you already have the D16A6, the best non-VTEC SOHC motor, otherwise you're rocking some D15b variant.
The D family share a lot of parts. Every D series transmission will bolt onto every engine, but remember that 92+ transmissions will use a hydraulic clutch, so you'll probably be keeping (or buying) a cable D tranny. The DOHC ZC gearbox uses a different differential than the other D transmissions, using larger integra axles, but it will still bolt up to the other blocks fine. Note that some of the newer blocks (D16Z6) do not have threaded holes to bolt the ZC intermediate shaft to the block.
These will all bolt right in to your CRX with no custom mounts. The DOHC ZC will stick up a little high on the timing belt side, and the cover may rub your USDM hood, but otherwise everything should fit fine.

D16A6
Found in: 88-91 CRX/Civic Si
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: PM6 OBD0
Estimated Cost: ~$500

As I said before, this is more than likely the cheapest and easiest swap. If you have an Si you already have one of these and you might consider rebuilding your stock motor instead of swapping a used one in. If you're starting off with a DX, you'll need to convert your car to MPFI (but you already knew that, right?). If you have an HF, you just need the motor and ECU, assuming you rewired the shift light thing already. For either one, get the Si/A6 exahust manifold and intake manifold and either the stock Si or an aftermarket intake. If you have an HF you might also want to upgrade the little tiny stock exhaust. This is pretty much a bolt-in job once you're rewired, unless you're swapping hubs or going from auto to manual.

D16Z6
Found in: 92-95 Civic Si/EX, Del Sol Si
Power: [email protected] [email protected] RPM
Stock ECU: P28 OBD1
Estimated Cost: $600+

The Z6 is the first of the three SOHC VTEC motors, and it's pretty easy to come by. To run it correctly, you will need to convert to OBD1 using a VTEC capable ECU. You will also need to run wires for the VTEC solenoid and pressure switch. There is some minor wire extending to do using the Z6 intake manifold that doesn't even require cutting/resoldering wires. You will need a different upper radiator hose as well, but the stock one can be cut to fit just fine. You won't be using the Z6 transmission most likely, it's hydraulic. The Z6 is a fairly common swap because these engines are plentiful and relatively cheap, and they enjoy good aftermarket support due to their popularity. Don't expect to be blowing away cars at the strip with this motor. It is good for an autocross car, as are the other SOHC VTEC options, the power is relatively peaky and perfect for those first-gear courses.

D16Y8
Found in: 96-00 Civic EX
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU P2P OBD2a
Estimated Cost: $600+

The D16Y8 is the other USDM SOHC VTEC motor. Really not too much different from the Z6, it supposedly gets better low-end torque and better fuel economy due to the swirl port design (as opposed to the Z6's tumble ports). This swap is exactly the same as the Z6 as far as bolting it in and wiring. You'll want to run it off a P28, it should run fine on that basemap, but you'll want to tune it or at least get the proper map for it. The A6 distributor will bolt up to the Y8's head if you don't want to convert to OBD1, but that's not recommended. There is concern about the oiling capabilities of the Y8, there have been reports of oil pump failures with this block. The Y8 oil pump flows 35.3 qt/min at 6800RPM, as compared to 46.4 qt/min at 6250 for the A6 and 47.6 qt/min for the Z6. This probably isn't an issue with a stock Y8 powered car, but if you're planning on modding it, it might be something to consider. Like the Z6, the Y8 has a good aftermarket. The Y8 also has the best OEM D series intake manifold, try to get that with the engine.

D15b VTEC (JDM)
Found in: 92-95 Civic VTi
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
ECU: P08 OBD1
Estimated Cost: $600+

This JDM 1.5L motor is almost identical to the Z6, they even share the same head casting. Swapping is exactly the same. This motor is better than the Z6 because you can brag to your friends that not only is it a mere 1.5L, but it's also JDM.

DOHC ZC (JDM)
Found in: 88-91 CRX/Civic Si
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
ECU: PM7
Estimated Cost: $800+

This is the only DOHC that will drop right in to your USDM CRX. It is very similar to the 88-89 Integra's D16A1, they share a lot of parts (the A1 won't bolt in). If you can't get the PM7 ECU, you can run it off the 88-89 Teg's PG7 just fine, and in a pinch the PM6 will run it, but not optimally. The DOHC ZC has a unique transmission, with closer ratio gears and equal length axles. You will need the ZC's intermediate shaft to use this, and 90-93 Integra axles. Some ZCs also came factory with a helical limited slip differential, but don't count on getting one of those. Though the ratios aren't much better with the ZC tranny than the Si one, you can use the Si's final drive with the ZC gearset to make a nice quick transmisssion. The ZC's timing belt cover will rub a stock USDM hood, you can fix that by not using the upper cover, cutting your hood skeleton, or getting another hood (ZC bump hood or SiR front end/hood). The DOHC ZC is one motor I can recommend running OBD0, as it was meant to be that way, and if you're not tuning you might as well save the money.
Be careful when buying a DOHC ZC. They used to be very popular swaps because of the low cost relative to B series engines, and a lot were imported from Japan. That means there are a lot of them over here that have been driven hard and possibly abused. There havent been new ZCs made since the early 1990s, and the ones coming over from Japan still are probably the ones that weren't originally selected for import in the mid 1990s, meaning they could potentially be lower quality because there isn't as much selection now.

Note on the SOHC ZCs
There are two versions of the ZC that are SOHC. One is the non-VTEC, and it's almost identical to the D16A6, the difference being in the cam. It's a minute difference that gets blown up on the internet, you can read the specs on it here and decide for yourself. The other one is the SOHC VTEC ZC, which is identical to the D16Z6.

Mini-Me (head swap)
Found in: D16Z6/D16Y8 head, your stock 16V block
Power:
ECU: P28 (best choice)
Estimated Cost: $100-$200 (head only)

All the D series SOHC blocks are very closely related, and the heads are swappable. This means you can bolt a VTEC head to your stock A6 block (or D15b2 if you have a DX). You cannot do this with the HF block, as the pistons only have 8 valve reliefs. You'll have slightly higher compression with this setup over a stock SOHC VTEC due to the A6 pistons, which aren't dished as much. Wiring is the same as the Z6/Y8, but the work is obviously less since you only need to pull and replace the head. I'll refer you again to my thread on building a mini-me for guidance on this swap.

B-Series
This family of engines has always been extremely popular to swap. The CRX SiR came with a B16 from the factory, and a lot of enthusiasts believe that it belongs in the car. These motors can be found in USDM Integras, Del Sols, and Civics, and JDM CRXs, Civics, and Integras. Chances are, you'll be getting an imported motor from somewhere like HMotors if you're getting a B16, or from a USDM Integra for the B18 series.
The B series motors are known for revving high and putting out high power for their displacement, though you won't be making a lot more torque over a D series due to the similar displacement. All of the B engines enjoy a healthy aftermarket because of their popularity. A lot of parts interchange between the motors of the series as well, and like the D-series, transmissions are swappable. Most of them will have hydraulic transmissions, so you'll need to convert to cable using an adapter like HASport makes.
These motors are a bit more expensive than the D family, and they do not just bolt in. You will need to buy mounts for them, plan on $400-$500 from a good company like HASport, depending whether or not you need a cable to hydraulic conversion for the transmission. You'll also need a shift linkage that will work with the B series transmission, which will cost $150, unless you make your own. You'll also need to dent the engine bay a little bit to fit the alternator, and you may need to shim the hood or replace it with a different style (the newest version of HASport mounts allow all but the B18c* to clear the hood).

Here is an old article about swapping a B16.

A note on oddball B-Series motors
As with the mini-me, there are hybrid motor setups with the B platform as well. These include LS/VTEC and CRVTEC (B20 VTEC). Since this article is intended to give a beginner a guide to swapping, I'm not including them. I am also not including any of the B20 series of motors. The B20B and B20Z from the CRV are essentially useless in a CRX unmodified. The B20A and B21A from 88-91 Preludes are also useless for us, they hardly make more power, and they aren't anything like the other B engines. Finally, it's possible you may come across a 1.8L B block with a B18C3 stamp on it. Bas tells me that this is a replacement block, something that didn't come stock in anything, but you would get one if you ordered a new block from the factory (or if you bought someone's used motor).

B16A (JDM)
Found in: 89-91 CRX/Civic SiR
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: PW0 OBD0
Estimated Cost: $1300

B16A (JDM)
Found in: 92-95 Civic SiR II
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P30 OBD1
Estimated Cost: $1800

B16A2
Found in: 96-97 Del Sol VTEC, 99-00 Civic Si
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P2T OBD2
Estimated Cost: $2000

B16A3
Found in: 94-95 Del Sol VTEC
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P30 OBD1
Estimated Cost: $2000

This motor is the one that "belongs" in the CRX, as it came in the SiR in Japan. The B16 variants are pretty common to swap into the CRX, and like all the other B motors they are a great base to build from. If you're planning to drop it in and leave it stock, you might want to consider spending a lot less money and building your stock A6 or another D series, the B16 is unimpressive stock compared to a mildly built D16 (at a fraction of the cost). The B16 motors are all DOHC and have VTEC, and love to rev high (hence the large tq/hp gap). I've listed three B16A variants, there may be more out there. The B16A from the CRX/Civic SiR comes with a cable transmission, while the newer ones will be hyrdraulic and require conversion. The B16A2/A3 from the Del Sol VTEC and 99-00 Si (EM1) is the only USDM B16 motor.

B16B (JDM)
Found in: 98-00 Civic Type=R
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: PCT OBD2
Estimated Cost: $3800

This CTR motor is a bit rare, it's basically a de-stroked B18C5 (Type R). Like all of the B-series motors, this one revs high, all the way to 9000RPM! This isn't a popular swap because it's expensive, and though it does have high power output, the torque is still somewhat lacking due to the low displacement compared to the other 1.8L motors in the family.

B17A
Found in: 92-93 Integra GSR
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P61 OBD1
Estimated Cost: $1500

This is a very rare motor, with similar output to other VTEC B series engines. You probably won't come across one, look for a more common alternative for the same price.

B18A
Found in: 90-91 Integra LS/GS/RS
Power: [email protected] [email protected] (90-91) [email protected] [email protected] (92-93)
Stock ECU: PR4 (OBD0, 90-91) P74 (OBD1, 92-93)
Estimated Cost: $800

The first "LS" motor, as the B18A/B are referred to, are the only non-VTEC B-series motors. These are plentiful used and in junk yards, as they are swapped out by Integra owners and also the sheer number of crashed tegs makes them readily available. Not a bad increase in power over your stock D series, and it also gets your car ready for another B swap down the line. Wiring is minimal, since you can run it with your stock OBD0 setup.

B18B
Found in: 94-01 Integra LS/GS/RS
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P74 (94-95 OBD-1) P75 (96-01 OBD-2)
Estimated Cost: $1500

The other LS motor, similar to the B18A but with slightly more power. Not worth the extra money if you have the choice, but again, a solid base to start building a B-swapped CRX from.

B18C1
Found in: 94-01 Integra GS-R
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P72 OBD1 and OBD2
Estimated Cost: $2800

The B18C series, though expensive, are excellent motors, with very high power output, great potential, and very well built. Because they were marketed in the US, they are pretty easy to find (assuming you're in the US of course). You will need to modify the hood of your CRX for all of the B18C series of motors, they are a bit tall even with the HASport mounts. An SiR front or SiR-style hood will clear the motor, as will a one-piece fibreglass front end ;) . Wiring is a little more complicated, but there are harnesses and kits available.

B18C5
Found in: 97-01 Integra Type R
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P73 OBD2
Estimated Cost: $4500

The USDM Type-R motor is the best B series engine you'll find stock in a US car. Swapping is almost identical to the B18C1, but you get a little more power (for a lot more money). Generally if you're on a budget, you would be better to use a C1 and source C5 parts to build it with.

B18C (JDM) Blacktop
Found in: 95-97 Integra SiR-G
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P72 OBD1
Estimated Cost: $3200

Similar to the other B18C motors, this one is JDM so most likely you'll be buying it from an importer.

B18C (JDM) Redtop
Found in: 96-01 Integra Type R
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P73 OBD1
Estimated Cost: $4500

Another high-RPM B series motor, the JDM equivalent of the USDM B18C5.

B18C4 (EDM)
Found in: 98-2000 Civic Aerodeck 1.8 VTi (5-door)
Power: 185 hp, 130 tq
Stock ECU: P72 OBD1 and OBD2
Estimated Cost: $3500

B18C6 (EDM)
Found in: 97-01 Integra Type R
Power: 190 hp, 130 tq
Stock ECU: P73 OBD2
Estimated Cost: $4500

H-Series
The H series is the biggest engine you can *easily* get in your CRX. It's not very popular, but it is growing due to mount kits now offered by both HASport and Explicit Speed Performance. Many people will opt to use an H2B adapter so they can use a B series transmission with the H22. The ESP kit will fit the motor under a stock USDM hood, but the HASport one requires at the minimum an SiR style hood to fit. You will need a cable to hydro conversion if you don't use a cable B series tranny. You'll also need a Prelude or older Accord cable linkage and shifter if you use the H series transmission. In addition to the mounts and tranny parts, you will need to get an H22 compatible front crossmember; ESP sells one as a bundle with their swap kit. The engine bay will need serious modification: both kits require removing the passenger side mount and welding in a new one, as well as "clearancing" the rear crossmember for the large H-series transmission. New custom axles are required as well. Wiring isn't bad, you have to extend wires for the now front-mounted alternator, and otherwise it's basically like a B18C1 swap.
The H22 is a bargain in terms of output per dollar. Despite all the stuff required for it, the engine cost is relatively low. It also comes stock with more power and torque than any B series, which require a lot of money and time in modifications to get close to the output of an H22, and of course the old saying "there is no replacement for displacement" applies here as well (it was said before the development of i-VTEC apparently), you'll always make more torque than a more expensive NA B-series. That said, the H22 is not recommended as a beginner swap, due to the work involved and skill required. I'm only going to talk about the H22, as the H23 is not considered worthwhile to swap.

The H22 variants are all very similar, all the JDM ones are simply badged H22, while the US and European variants are H22A*. Important to note is that some models, like the 97+ USDM Type-SH, came with an electronic traction control device (ATTS) in the transmission. You will not be able to use those transmissions.

The JDM engines are:

H22 (JDM)
Found in: 92-96 Prelude VTEC
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: P13 OBD1
Estimated Cost: $2000

H22 (JDM)
Found in: 97-01 Prelude SiR
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: ??
Estimated Cost: $2000

H22 (JDM)
Found in: 97-01 Prelude Type-S, 00-01 Accord Euro R
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: ??
Estimated Cost: $3500

And the USDM engines:

H22A1
Found in: 94-96 Prelude VTEC
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: ??
Estimated Cost: $1800 ?

H22A1
Found in: 97-98 Prelude (all)
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: ??
Estimated Cost: $1800 ?

H22A2
Found in: 99-01 Prelude (all)
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: ??
Estimated Cost: $1800 ?

K-series
The K series, specifically the K20A, is the newest swap out there. It's also considered one the best, as many believe the K series motors are the best Honda has made so far in consumer cars. This is what came stock in the recently discontinued USDM RSX, the Integra everywhere else, and the TSX (K24). Like the H22, this motor is not for newbies. It will cost you a LOT of money to get the swap done, even if you do the work yourself. Again like the H22 it requires extensive modification and welding to work, and an SiR front end is required. If you do get this thing in your CRX, not only will you have a monster of a car, but every kid on the internet boards will love you, and everything you touch will turn to gold.

I'm not going to mention the K24, as it's even less a viable option than the K20 for most new people. If you have to ask, you probably aren't ready to do it.

Here is an article CRXBart wrote about how to get the K20 into your CRX.

K20 variants:

K20A (JDM)
Found in: 02-06 Integra Type R
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: PRC OBD2
Estimated Cost: $5600

K20A2
Found in: 2002-2004 RSX Type S
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: PRB OBD2
Estimated Cost: $4000

K20A3
Found in: 02-05 Civic Si
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: PNF OBD2
Estimated Cost: $2500

K20Z1
Found in: 05-06 RSX Type S
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: PRB OBD2
Estimated Cost: $5000

K20Z3
Found in: 06+ Civic Si
Power: [email protected] [email protected]
Stock ECU: RRB OBD2
Estimated Cost: $4500
 
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