Honda CRX Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As you all probably know, I'm building a hi-comp mini-me slower than molasses.

I bought fresh P-29s, and ordered them 20 over.

I know I need my block bored out. Now, I know machining is expensive for a good reason, but, after talking to Tom (Downest) he suggested boring the block myself. I'm a bit nervous since there are some strict tolerances. If I do so, I would be using a stone hone, and would try to find some honing oil. I think I've seen it in Advance/Autozone.

Boring is $100 at my local shop (best one in the area). The thing is, they charge a $40 cleaning fee. A stone hone is only $22, so that would free up a bit more money for bearings and gaskets.

I have vernier calipers, and feeler gauges, but no micrometers. My main concern is how hard would it be to cut .010 off the walls? Has anyone done this on their own, or is it a "take it in" deal. With the stone hone I don't really see a way that the bore could be uneven, or out of round.

Any opinions? Worse comes to worse, I take off too much, and have to sell the pistons and get .040 over, or find a new block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,297 Posts
If it were me, I'd shell out the 140 so I know it's done right and cleaned. It would really suck to blow a rod/piston out hte side of the block because you did something wrong.

$140 for that piece of mind would help me sleep at night.

Not to mention, after looking at the lower half of a lot of honda motors, spending $40 to have it cleaned (inside and out) would be worth it.

Just my fifth of a thenth of a dollar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,297 Posts
downest said:
The cleaning is probably not an option, they will clean it whether or not he wants to, before and after machining it. My local shop calls that a "hazardous waste disposal fee."
One of the shops I used to work in used a large chemical vat to clean and degrease anything before they machined it. After milling, etc.. they pressure washed and chem dipped it again to clean out any residue from the shaving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
downest said:
WHOA MAN!

I didn't say bore it yourself, I said you can hone it yourself, as well as work the bottom end over for oiling purposes.
Oh yea, I'm already working on the Endyn tricks.

Yea, thats why I was so hesitant when you suggested DIY, lol. Maybe you thought I meant hone even though I said bore?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,512 Posts
Scott...If you have never done something like this before I wouldn't suggest boring a block unless you have the bore machine.
As you already know I finished my 12:1 A6 last fall and paid my local machine shop guru to bore mine .20 over as well as deck the block,but thats another story.
Cough up the dough and get it right.I watched the machinist as he bored my block.I remember him using a guide plate that he bolted to my block before boring soo unless you have that expensive tool leave that stuff to the professionals mang.. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The money is only part of it... landscape work is a bit slow around NY in midwinter... at least I've been plowing, but those school loans eat most of that up.

I also just want to make some progress on it. Plus, anything I can do myself, well, why not? Especially if I can do it right. I guess I'm also weighing the value of knowing its done right, against the pleasure of doing it myself (that would be if it came out right :p).

I was also thinking with the stone hone it should keep the bores straight, so the only thing to worry about would be the tolerances. But yea, they are professionals for a reason... and the shop I got my quote from is the best, in some opinions, in Rochester.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
779 Posts
Good lord do not bore it out yourself. You will not get it straight and it will give you issues. You can hone them yourself, hell you can rent kits to do it. But a bore, you want a machine shop to do it. It's well worth the money to do it right. If you can't afford to build the engine properly, don't do it at all man. Save your money slowly and then get it done.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top