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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I just signed up to the board and am hoping to get some information for my GF's 1989 CRX DX... I would like to know what the best bang for buck modifcations there are on this car...

I've done a bit of searching and read through a few boards and posts.. It looks like CAI & a Catback are a good place to start.

1. What are the big brands and basic modifications out there for her car?
2. The clutch is slipping, she doesn't want a race clutch BUT she definatly wouldn't mind a longer lasting, better gripping clutch so long as it doesn't affect the drivability or comfort of her car "too much".
3. Also she says it seems to be running a bit more sluggish lately.. She can't remember when she last had them changed. (Probably 2 years ago). How hard are plug changes on these cars? :)
 

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2. Get an Exedy OEM replacement clutch, a little better than stock but not overkill

3. really easy, but you might want to do a complete tune up, change the oil and filter, fuel filter, adjust the valves, etc

1. If you are any good with working on cars, convert the thing to MPFI. Everyone is going to tell you to do that, and from what I understand it isn't that hard. Intakes can go from cheap, like making your own or getting one on ebay, to very expensive, like AEM (over $200). If you do get an exhaust, please dont get a huge can that looks like it belongs on a Suzuki sportbike. There are lots of cheap/free mods you can do to make the car perform better, but start with getting it running right, do the tune-up.
 

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Invidia is an AWSOME catback for the rex imo, Cai doens't really help at all for performance gain.......25+ horse power with this small mod...... ya right...........

even a stage one clutch wouldn't be overkill great grip and about 40% over stock durability depending on how good she is at driving stick

full tune up cap rotor, plugs, wires, oil, oil filter, fuel filter all the good stuff

best bang for the but for performance would def be turbo
 

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Ditto on the Exedy clutch kit, http://www.clutchcityonline.com/ has them for a good price, $110.
Also check and clean all the grounds and batt cables, you'd be supprized by how much better just that will make it run.
And don't waste money on platinum plugs, just get the regular NGK's
 

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The first things you should start with are changing that clutch. A rear main oil seal is a good idea while your there. Get the flywheel resurfaced to, dont skip that part. Then change the oil, plugs, wires etc.. You can also check your vacuum lines for leaks, they can cause all sorts of problems with the running condition of the motor. Do it one at a time though, so you dont get them mixed up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies!

Look like well do the clutch and "tune up" asap!

Where abouts can I find the fuel filter on this car? Any guides on-line?
 

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Tobyz28 said:
Where abouts can I find the fuel filter on this car? Any guides on-line?
You can find the Service manual onine, but I dont know if there is a link anywhere on this site.... somebody should be able to point you that direction.

The fuel filter is on the firewall, passenger side. It looks like a black little can, both fuel lines are on top. Be careful not to lose the washers when you take the fuel lines off.
 

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Shouldn't you use new washers? I haven't done mine yet, but I plan on getting the washers at the local Honda dealership. When I get my oil filters there, they give me the crush washers for free (as they should) out of a box they have. I would think they should give you the ones for the fuel lines as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Did the plugs already (holy cow it was easy!)! Cleaned the ground straps too.
Q: Is it normal for the plugs to get covered in fresh oil when pulling them out? All 4 had a good chunk of oil on them....

Bought a new fuel filter and a cap + Rotor. Found a guide for the distributor so that should be easy... i'll be doing these another day as the rain has started to kick in... again.. :(
 

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Tobyz28 said:
Q: Is it normal for the plugs to get covered in fresh oil when pulling them out? All 4 had a good chunk of oil on them...
No. There are seals in each spark plug tube that are supposed to keep the oil out (the surrounding area has oil in it). The seal's rubber gets dried out, hardens and shrinks with time, letting oil seep by. If you're ordering parts from Honda, get the valve cover seals - there may be a kit, but if not there should be one big one for the perimeter of the cover and four smaller ones for the spark plug tubes. If you still get oil in the tubes, the O-rings at the base of the tubes need to be replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
bobski said:
Tobyz28 said:
Q: Is it normal for the plugs to get covered in fresh oil when pulling them out? All 4 had a good chunk of oil on them...
No. There are seals in each spark plug tube that are supposed to keep the oil out (the surrounding area has oil in it). The seal's rubber gets dried out, hardens and shrinks with time, letting oil seep by. If you're ordering parts from Honda, get the valve cover seals - there may be a kit, but if not there should be one big one for the perimeter of the cover and four smaller ones for the spark plug tubes. If you still get oil in the tubes, the O-rings at the base of the tubes need to be replaced.
Sounds easy enough... 5 gaskets to be replaced. Is it easy to adjust valves while i have the cover off as well? Whats the correct valve adjustment procedure?
 

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Tobyz28 said:
Is it easy to adjust valves while i have the cover off as well? Whats the correct valve adjustment procedure?
I dread doing valve adjustments, but that's probably just because it's so repetative (four valves per cylinder does have a down side).
You want to do this adjustment on a dead-cold engine. The free-play in the valves is there to account for thermal expansion of the various metal parts, so it's important that the engine is at room temperature.
Once the valve cover and upper timing belt covers are off, you will need a 17mm socket, extension (3" will do) and ratchet for turning the crank, a 10mm box-end wrench for the tappet nuts, a flat-head screwdriver for the tappets themselves and two feeler gauges: 0.007-0.009" for the intake valves and 0.009-0.011" for the exhaust.
Start by turning the crank until cylinder No. 1 is at TDC (top dead center) of it's compression stroke. You can tell by looking at the cam gear and the crank pulley: The "UP" marking on the face of the cam gear will be up and the two grooves will align with the valve cover mating surface. You should be able to sight down the pointers on the lower timing belt cover at the crank pulley and see the single TDC groove (in the rim of the pulley) line up. There should also be a group of 3 grooves on the crank pulley for ignition timing... The TDC groove should be to the right of those.
All four valve rockers on cylinder No. 1 (closest to the timing belt) should be slightly loose at this point. Break loose all four tappet lock-nuts (the nut on each rocker arm) and back out the tappets (the screw in the center of each locknut) a turn or so. Don't try to do more than one valve at a time... The idea to be precise, not flat-rate it. Slip the appropriate feeler gauge between the bottom of the tappet and end of the valve stem (the metal pin in the center of each spring). Put your box-end wrench on the lock-nut and use the screwdriver to tighten the tappet.
The goal here is to get the clearance between the tappet and valve stem to the exact thickness of the feeler gauge. If you over-tighten the tappet, you will start to compress the spring and open the valve you're working on, causing the clearance to be too small once you remove the feeler and the valve closes again. If you don't tighten it enough, the oil film between the cam, rocker, tappet, feeler gauge and valve stem may result in too large a clearance. Too big a clearance will result in a noisy valve train where as too small could result in a burnt valve... As such, it's better to be a little loose. It may help you get a feel for what's going on if you tighten the tappet until the valve starts to open, back it off till it's loose and repeat a few times. Some people say to do it by how much drag you get when you try to move the feeler gauge around, but I've found the exact angle you hold the gauge at can affect that quite a bit.
Anyway, once you have the tappet where you want it, hold the screwdriver (and thus the tappet) perfectly still while tightening the locknut with the open-end wrench you put in place earlier.
Repeat with the other 3 valves on this cylinder, making sure you've got the proper feeler gauge for the valve you're working on.
Rotate the crank 180° counter clock-wise... The cam pulley should rotate 90°. Repeat the above on cylinder No. 3. Rotate another 180° (TDC on the crank, the cam pulley will now be upside down) and adjust cylinder No. 4 (closest to the distributor). Rotate still another 180° and adjust cylinder No. 2. In order, that's 1, 3, 4, 2 - the engine's sparkplug firing order. If this is your first valve adjustment, it's probably not a bad idea to go through another cycle checking your work with the feeler gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Great write up! I'm sure its not that bad, on my Camaro i have two valve covers and 8 cylinders, one of them behind an alternator... adjusting valves on that is a pain in the butt.. and don't get me started on the plugs on that thing ;)

I think i'll give it a go when i get the new gasket...
 
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