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You get what you pay for. In this case it's hard to say what your getting because they are not even claiming them to be fog lights, they simply say they are amber lenses.

Fogs are designed to keep the light low and only project a limited distance to minimize the glare bouncing back at you.

Most people these days seem to want fogs mostly as a fashion accessory to dress up the front of their car rather then to actually try and see better in the fog. Fogs used as fogs will only be on during inclement weather. Fogs used as fashions accessories may be turned on when the weather is perfectly clear. In all cases fogs or other auxiliary driving lights must be turned off when 4 bulb high beams are used or you exceed the legal limit for the number of lights on the front of the car.

If you want quality fogs I suggest you keep shopping till you find something that is at least claimed to be a fog light. If all you want is cheep costume jewelry for the front of your car then they may do just fine.

Fashion fogs don't impress me in the least. To me they just represent a hacked up bumper and wire harness for the sake of fashion trends or impressing people with shiny object syndrome.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mike,

You always give the best quality advice and you answered my question in the matter i was looking for! (actually above and beyond as my question was very vague) I will keep on looking. I do want a quality fog light that will do its job correctly but without hacking of my bumper (preludes = ruined bumper) and i do want a type of "fashion accessory" but with a function. Thanks again mike for the great information and help. Ill let you know how my search goes for a good fog light.

Best regards,
Alex
 

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I'm going to dismiss the DLAA lamps as cheep Chinese crap lighting. Notice that the packaging doesn't claim they are fog lights, it's the ebay seller that makes that claim.

The lamps linked to have no glare control structure around the bulb thus allowing direct line of sight to the filament. Because of this they can't produce a beam pattern that would be legal for low beams or any auxiliary lamp for use with low beams.

Those DLAA lamps are going to mostly flood the road with uncontrolled glare light. If you just want yellow costume jewelry and don't mind that your fogs put out as much glare as typical high beams they may be fine. In real fog conditions much of that glare light bounces back at you so I would expect them to be crap for actual use as fog lights.

Mike
 

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Your best bet for finding quality fogs is to look for fog lamps made by a known maker of quality automotive lighting like Stanly or Hella. OEM fogs from most any model car should be decent quality.

When shopping for off brand lights the following are details you can look for.

For new lights if the manufacturers packaging does not call them fog lights they are not likely designed to be good fog lights.

To produce a well controlled and directed beam of light there are two design features that must be present. There must be a shield that blocks all direct light so that all light leaving the lamp must bounce off the reflector first. There must also be either a fluted front lens or a complex (faceted) reflector. The absence of either and the lamp will not be able to adequately control the light output. The presence of both doesn't assure good control, just means there is potential to control the light.

It would be possible to make a projector based fog lamp but again if the manufacture doesn't claim it to be a fog don't expect it to be designed like a fog. I don't think there would be any such thing as a proper HID fog because a fog must be limited in intensity or it will glare right back at you.

You can look at cars with OEM fogs in parking lots or showrooms to see what design details your looking for.

Mike
 

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DLAA fogs work fine. It's all in the adjustment. Fit and aimed correctly they function and visually emit the same pattern and color as my 89 prelude Si did.

Used correctly DLAA is a good product providing both form and function. Form, (almost perfect fit with 90/91 bumper) and Function (yellow so people would be more likely to see me plus the common wet and foggy weather in Oregon). I got tired of people pulling out in front of me or cutting me off because they didn't see me. Our cars are so small that most people overlook them like they would a motorcycle.
 

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I saw these at Harbor in Oct. they looked like a a cheaply made sealed beam mini headlight I did not like it

they are in a carton box I opened looked at them :yuck:threw them back on the shelf
You should buy them
jump wire 1 to your Batt
try one then return them
 

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jacksonww said:
DLAA fogs work fine. It's all in the adjustment. Fit and aimed correctly they function and visually emit the same pattern and color as my 89 prelude Si did.

Used correctly DLAA is a good product providing both form and function. Form, (almost perfect fit with 90/91 bumper) and Function (yellow so people would be more likely to see me plus the common wet and foggy weather in Oregon). I got tired of people pulling out in front of me or cutting me off because they didn't see me. Our cars are so small that most people overlook them like they would a motorcycle.
For starters the purpose of fogs is to try and see a bit further into the fog rather then to be visible in the fog. With any headlights on your going to be visible from much further then you can see so I don't get the point of saying you need them to be seen. There is merit to the EDM rear fog light if your concerned about not being seen.

The test of fog light performance is when fog severely limits visibility (think 50 feet) do they enable you to see further or do they bounce so much glare back at you that it reduces visibility. If a set of fogs does more harm then good in this extreme case the same relationship probably exists will lessor fog but is not so obvious.

There are several factors in how fogs work. The yellow light penetrates fog better then white or blue light. Fogs are mounted low and directed low to minimize the glare that bounces back at you.

The directed low aspect is critical to fog light performance and is clearly absent in the design of the DLAA lights. Looking at them it's clear they lack any manner of beam shaping design features. The reflector looks to be simple or even crude. The only lens like features of the front glass is so far off to the side they aren't going to have much influence on beam shape. There is no structure around the bulb to direct or form the beam shape. There designed like mini floods and probably not very good ones.

I remain skeptical that the DLAA flood will make a good fog even if it is mounted low and yellow.

The best simple advise for fog visibility is to use proper 9006 low beam bulbs. All the common street hacks (9005, 9011, and HID) defeat the forward portion of the glare shield and floods a bunch of glare in front of you so it bounces back at you. Not so much a problem (for you) on a clear night but in the fog is where the driver gets to experience the glare they usually inflict on others.

In closing, from wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automotive_lighting

wikipedia said:
Front fog lamps provide a wide, bar-shaped beam of light with a sharp cutoff at the top, and are generally aimed and mounted low.[10][11][12] They may be either white or selective yellow. They are intended for use at low speed to increase the illumination directed towards the road surface and verges in conditions of poor visibility due to rain, fog, dust or snow. As such, they are often most effectively used in place of dipped-beam headlamps, reducing the glareback from fog or falling snow, although the legality varies by jurisdiction of using front fog lamps without low beam headlamps.

Use of the front fog lamps when visibility is not seriously reduced is often prohibited (for example in the United Kingdom), as they can cause increased glare to other drivers, particularly in wet pavement conditions, as well as harming the driver's own vision due to excessive foreground illumination.[13]

The respective purposes of front fog lamps and driving lamps are often confused, due in part to the misconception that fog lamps are necessarily selective yellow, while any auxiliary lamp that makes white light is a driving lamp. Automakers and aftermarket parts and accessories suppliers frequently refer interchangeably to "fog lamps" and "driving lamps" (or "fog/driving lamps"). In most countries, weather conditions rarely necessitate the use of fog lamps, and there is no legal requirement for them, so their primary purpose is frequently cosmetic. They are often available as optional extras or only on higher trim levels of many cars. Studies have shown that in North America more people inappropriately use their fog lamps in dry weather than use them properly in poor weather.[14]
Mike
 

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TheRetrofitSource used to sell "Blazer" Projector fogs with a good cut-off. But a few people have retro'd the Mini-H1's into to light housings and used 3000k bulbs. Not super reach, but little to no glare and good width.
 

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msc said:
jacksonww said:
DLAA fogs work fine. It's all in the adjustment. Fit and aimed correctly they function and visually emit the same pattern and color as my 89 prelude Si did.

Used correctly DLAA is a good product providing both form and function. Form, (almost perfect fit with 90/91 bumper) and Function (yellow so people would be more likely to see me plus the common wet and foggy weather in Oregon). I got tired of people pulling out in front of me or cutting me off because they didn't see me. Our cars are so small that most people overlook them like they would a motorcycle.
For starters the purpose of fogs is to try and see a bit further into the fog rather then to be visible in the fog. With any headlights on your going to be visible from much further then you can see so I don't get the point of saying you need them to be seen. There is merit to the EDM rear fog light if your concerned about not being seen.

The test of fog light performance is when fog severely limits visibility (think 50 feet) do they enable you to see further or do they bounce so much glare back at you that it reduces visibility. If a set of fogs does more harm then good in this extreme case the same relationship probably exists will lessor fog but is not so obvious.

There are several factors in how fogs work. The yellow light penetrates fog better then white or blue light. Fogs are mounted low and directed low to minimize the glare that bounces back at you.

The directed low aspect is critical to fog light performance and is clearly absent in the design of the DLAA lights. Looking at them it's clear they lack any manner of beam shaping design features. The reflector looks to be simple or even crude. The only lens like features of the front glass is so far off to the side they aren't going to have much influence on beam shape. There is no structure around the bulb to direct or form the beam shape. There designed like mini floods and probably not very good ones.

I remain skeptical that the DLAA flood will make a good fog even if it is mounted low and yellow.

The best simple advise for fog visibility is to use proper 9006 low beam bulbs. All the common street hacks (9005, 9011, and HID) defeat the forward portion of the glare shield and floods a bunch of glare in front of you so it bounces back at you. Not so much a problem (for you) on a clear night but in the fog is where the driver gets to experience the glare they usually inflict on others.

In closing, from wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automotive_lighting

wikipedia said:
Front fog lamps provide a wide, bar-shaped beam of light with a sharp cutoff at the top, and are generally aimed and mounted low.[10][11][12] They may be either white or selective yellow. They are intended for use at low speed to increase the illumination directed towards the road surface and verges in conditions of poor visibility due to rain, fog, dust or snow. As such, they are often most effectively used in place of dipped-beam headlamps, reducing the glareback from fog or falling snow, although the legality varies by jurisdiction of using front fog lamps without low beam headlamps.

Use of the front fog lamps when visibility is not seriously reduced is often prohibited (for example in the United Kingdom), as they can cause increased glare to other drivers, particularly in wet pavement conditions, as well as harming the driver's own vision due to excessive foreground illumination.[13]

The respective purposes of front fog lamps and driving lamps are often confused, due in part to the misconception that fog lamps are necessarily selective yellow, while any auxiliary lamp that makes white light is a driving lamp. Automakers and aftermarket parts and accessories suppliers frequently refer interchangeably to "fog lamps" and "driving lamps" (or "fog/driving lamps"). In most countries, weather conditions rarely necessitate the use of fog lamps, and there is no legal requirement for them, so their primary purpose is frequently cosmetic. They are often available as optional extras or only on higher trim levels of many cars. Studies have shown that in North America more people inappropriately use their fog lamps in dry weather than use them properly in poor weather.[14]
Mike
Try'em Mike. I think you will like'em. :mrgreen:
 
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