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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought it was going to be a major headache, but it was surprisingly easy. My little nehphew was playing with his new camera nearby, so I asked him to take some pics to document my work. Hope this will helps someone out. It took me about 1/2 hour to finish each side. Tools required: hammer, plier, 10mm-14mm-17mm sockets/wrenches, WD-40 or any other lubricants, ball joint removal tool (optional). Since this modification will greatly affect the handling and structural integrity of your car, if you don't feel comfortable performing the work yourself, hire a mechanic. I'm not responsible for any of your mishaps resulted from this post. Also, use extreme caution when working with car on jack stands. Use common sense and stop to get help when not sure of something.

Out of the box, one thing I noticed was how flimsy the Skunk2 mounting bracket is compared to the stock bracket. It was later confirmed, as seen in the 2nd picture, that the stock bracket is much stronger in resisting torsion or bending, thanks to the bent lip design. With that said, I still don't know if these brackets really provide any function to the system other than help holding the two bolts together, I opted to reuse the stock brackets and tossed the Skunk2 brackets.





I did not adjust the ball joint slide plates on the new control arm since there's no way to know how much adjustment is needed. I only tighten down the allen screws.

I started out by having the car on jack stands and front wheels removed. All procedures are typical for both sides.

Step 1A: Remove the little metal cap that covers the castle nut at the knuckle and upper ball joint by removing the (2) 10mm bolts.

Step 1B: With the castle nut exposed, remove the cotter pin and remove castle nut using 17mm wrench or socket.


Step 2: Pop the hood and go to the front strut tower. Locate the (2) 14mm nuts holding the upper control arm assembly and remove those nuts. You may have to remove some wiring brackets and fusebox to get to those nuts. Slightly tap on the bolts with the hammer to push them down away from the strut tower.


Step 3: With the arm bracket away from the frame, remove the joints from the arm using 14mm wrench. You may have to spray some WD-40 to loosen them up a little. Be careful not to damage brake lines during all these steps. Once both joints are separated, remove the entire mounting bracket out behind the strut, clean it down real good and put aside. If the joints need to be replaced, do so or you can use the entire new bracket from Skunk2.


Step 4: Now it's time to separate the knuckle from the upper ball joints. You can use a ball joint remover, but I just used a hammer and forced it out by pounding upward on the stud and with lots of WD-40. I did this because I knew I wasn't going to reuse the stock arm and didn't care about damaging the stock ball joint. Skunk2 kit comes with a new upper ball joint.


Step 5: Slide the mounting bracket that was removed in step 3 back behind the strut and bolt to the new Skunk2 upper control arm with the new 14mm bolts and nuts. This may take some maneuvering, but there should be plenty of wiggle room to bolt everything up. Again, be careful not to damage the brake lines.


Step 6: Pop the new upper ball joint into the knuckle and tighten the 17mm castle nut. Don't forget the cotter pin and the cover plate removed in step 1A. Line up the bolts on the mounting bracket and push them upward thru the mounting holes on the strut tower.


Step 7: Back to the engine bay and slightly tighten the 14mm nuts to the bolts from the mounting bracket below. Do not fully torque it at this time.

BTW, in case you perfectionist noticed the picture above does not match with what was shown in step 2, I appologize. I forgot to take picture of this step on this side.

Step 8: Put the wheels back on the car and lower the car back onto the ground. Go back to the engine bay and torque down all those 14mm nuts for the upper arm mounting brackets. Don't forget to put back all the wiring or brackets you might have removed for access. You are now done with the installation, but your car's alignment is probably in worse shape than before. You need to take it to an aligment shop, but this time, they have more room for camber adjusment by adjusting the slide plate held in place by those 6mm allen screws.


BTW, it's highly recommended to have camber kit for the rear too, unless you don't care about the two rear tires and never want to rotate them. Rear camber kit installation is a no brainer. Just (3) 14mm bolts to remove.

Please note that I didn't remove the strut to install the kit. I don't know if that would have been easier, but I did not feel like removing the strut assembly at the time. You can try that other method. Good luck.
 

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I'm in need of a camber kit really bad and was wondering if the +/-3 degress of adjustment really matters. My car is lowered on HnR springs so it's decently low. This is my first crx I use to own a eg and their camber kits came with +/-4 degress of adjustment. I'm looking to get a skunk2 camber kit and like I said it has +/-3 degrees. That should be enough to correct the negative camber right? I know this is probably a stupid question, but I'm just curious. Just wanting your input. Not sure what brand of camber kit to trust.
 

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chances are you dont need a camber kit unless you are correcting some bent part, but if you do want one the skunk kit is nice and +/- 3 degrees should be plenty to get your camber wherever you want it.

im curious as to why you think you need a camber kit?
 

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Nice work!

But, wouldn't it be easier to separate the balljoint from the knuckle before taking the bracket off the car?
 

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Angry said:
Nice work!

But, wouldn't it be easier to separate the balljoint from the knuckle before taking the bracket off the car?
I agree, I've noticed that the upper arm usually pulls up on the ball joint, so all u have to do is take the castle nut loose, and whack the knuckle on the side where the bottom of the balljoint goes thru with a hammer, and it pops right out.

Also, its a good idea IMO to grease up the little shaft on the ball joint that goes thru the knuckle before putting it back in, this way whenever u take it apart, its easier to pop it back out without damaging things.

Nice write up :)b
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hmm, I forgot I wrote this. Must have had a lot of time in the summer.

Angry said:
Nice work!
But, wouldn't it be easier to separate the balljoint from the knuckle before taking the bracket off the car?
You're probably correct, but if I remember correctly, there was a lot of cursing and pounding and the other process ended up working out for me.
 

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Hick_Rex said:
I'm in need of a camber kit really bad and was wondering if the +/-3 degress of adjustment really matters. My car is lowered on HnR springs so it's decently low. This is my first crx I use to own a eg and their camber kits came with +/-4 degress of adjustment. I'm looking to get a skunk2 camber kit and like I said it has +/-3 degrees. That should be enough to correct the negative camber right? I know this is probably a stupid question, but I'm just curious. Just wanting your input. Not sure what brand of camber kit to trust.
I had skunk2 camber kits on my 2000 Si, and it was pretty freakin low. The skunk2 + alignment shop = perfect alignment and no more tires getting eaten =)

i know a 2000 si isnt a crx but i would definitly buy a skunk2 camber kit again if i lower the rex.
 

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mattminerDOTcom said:
chances are you dont need a camber kit unless you are correcting some bent part, but if you do want one the skunk kit is nice and +/- 3 degrees should be plenty to get your camber wherever you want it.

im curious as to why you think you need a camber kit?
Because some people don't fully understand. Most people say it must be at 0 or it will wear your tires. I work at a tire factory and our new test radials run (on the machine) for 70k miles at -4 equivalant and wear evenly with the proper air pressure.
 

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Mista Bone said:
After 6-7k miles on my SKunk 2 Pro's, the upper ball joints are shot.
you also thought it was smart to use the incorrect knuckles and max out the available negative camber in order to COUNTER the positive camber of the wrong knuckles. leading it to bind to the structure of the welded arm and not as it was intended.

the only real caveat i've heard of these arms is that to make sure theres grease inside those boots to lube the balljoints. im not sure if this applies to Junk2, maybe just ebay or REDO or Omnicrap stuff. but at least Junk2 puts some thinking into making an application for the EF that actually fits.
 

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mycrxlife said:
I was wondering, Would I still need camber kit if I just go to a local shop and align my wheels? Thats the whole point of a camber yet rite
You have the TOE corrected to prevent tire wear.
Local shop will try to sell you a camber kit, don't take the bait.

Many people these days get camber kits for three reasons:
1.) They incorrectly believe they need it to prevent tire wear.
2.) They want to dial in their suspension for handling (track, auto-x, etc)
3.) They wanna be hella slammed and make their 'stance' perfect.
 
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