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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a T304 stainless steel cat back with a 4" fart can I want to cut off. I've finally found a dual outlet pipe I can bolt onto the 2 1/4" pipe if I can just cut the can off.

I've never tried to cut stainless steel before. I'd prefer to leave the cat back on the car while I cut it and I have no oxy-acetyline equipment anyway. The steel seems to be about 1/16 thick.

I have a jig saw I can get a hacksaw blade to fit - I also have a dremel with cutting wheels. Are either of these any good or do I need something more sturdy? Should I plan on lubricating as I cut?

Any ideas please?

Thanks!
 

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yeah it just stainless pipe ,cuts the same as any other exhaust pipe ,i wouldent use a jig saw though ,kinda think it would be dangerous ,do you have a sawz all ?? IM THINKING NOT SINCE YOU WOULD HEAVE MENTIONED lol whoops sorry for the caps um even a grinder with a cutting disk will work and ive done it on mine many times lol ,all you do it cut one side then the other

good luck and post pics when you done :wink:
 

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mattminerDOTcom said:
the dremel would suck, but a hacksaw, sawzall, cutoffwheel, anything like that should work great.
What he said ... a plain old hand hacksaw with a fresh blade should work just fine. Put some oil on the cut as you go to keep from overheating the blade, especially if you're using a powered saw.

I've always found the dremel cutoff wheels to be too fragile, not worth the trouble for anything other than really small work. On the other hand, I'm fond of using a carbide dremel cutter to hack a slot in the side of a nut that won't come off ... those thing will cut right into just about anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the tips - seems like a sabre saw is the answer. Since I don't do this very often, I'm tempted to buy an inexpensive one (Black & Decker - $40). Is that a stupid move or would it work, do you think?
 

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I'd say go for the pipe cutter, as it will get you a cleaner cut. Next up is the trusty hack saw with some oil for coolant. Takes a bit longer but its cheap and very functional.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Job's completed - thanks for your help. Here are the promised pictures (Pls, excuse the quality - I had to use my Palm Pilot)

Starting point - the ricey fart can that has to come off:


The tailpipe cutter from Autozone - I worked with this for about 20 minutes - it made a start but headway was way too slow!


What a difference a hacksaw made - the tailpipe cutter had cut a nice groove for the hacksaw so it didn't keep slipping.


And finally, after 5 minutes of sawing, it was off!


Then of course I found that the inside diameter of the dual tailpipe was about 1/64" too small. I cut two long parallel slits down the exhaust toward the hanger and reduced the diameter by hammering so the dual tailpipe would fit - sorry I forgot to take pictures :oops:

Here's the new dual tailpipe after I force fit it on. It's a very snug fit and I had to hammer it on.


I didn't like the slant tips which don't look stock so I bought two chrome tips from O'Reilly Autoparts to cover them up. Here's one of the tips, looking through the inside. I had to use a bolt-cutter to cut down the bolts that hold the tips on to stop them protruding too far.



And here's the finished job. Not quite stock - the pipes are about 1/2" bigger but close enough!



Tools:
Tailpipe cutter
Hacksaw
Hammer
Philips screwdriver
Lumps of wood to support the pipe.

Cost: $35.97
Dual tailpipe from Autozone - $21.99
Two chrome tipe from O'Reilly Autoparts - $13.98 for the pair.

Total labor time
About 1 1/2 hours (and I'm slow!)
 
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