Honda CRX Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,480 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I spray painted a heat sheild for exhaust pipes with the super high temp spray but it ended up bubbling and looking bad. I don't know how to do valve covers and I dont know what precautions to take.

Anyone care to post a small writeup or process? Woul my cover right now with no paint have a better heat output rather than one with paint on it? I know oem does it so it has to be ok somehow.

Any ideas, help, advice?

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,746 Posts
Hi temp paint is fine, it doesn't get nearly as hot as the exhaust. I painted mine over the summer, and 10k miles ago, it's holding up fine. I think for the exhaust you should use the 1000 degree hi-temp, not the normal 500 degree stuff. Here's a pic, don't mind the scratch on the front, not related to the paint quality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,146 Posts
I did the valve cover on my b16 a few years back and it came out great. I used the duplicolor anodized paint and regardless of what people said it held up fine. A few people here have seen it in person at the N meets and I got a few compliments on it.
These are the only pics i have of it right now. The rest are buried on the computer somewhere.




I will probably be doing this with my H22 valve cover and will do a write up on it when i do it.

The basics :

Its all in the prep work. Take your valve cover and soak it in aircraft stripper. It took me a few times to get all the oem coating off. A cheap brush helps alot, I picked one up at the dollar store for washing dishes that worked fine.

I sanded it lightly to smooth it out a little bit. On the letters I wanted them to shine so I started a little more corse than i did with the rest of the valve cover. slowly working my way up to finer and finer paper until I got the brushed aluminum shine I wanted.

I also washed it with dawn to get any grease off of it after I sanded it. Rinse a few times to make sure its clean. Let dry.

If you dont want to paint the letters there are a couple ways to go about it. You can either paint it all then come back with a piece of sandpaper and sand the letters down. Apply a small amount of oil to the letter so the paint wont stick. I wasnt comfortable with either one so I sat with a hobby knife and masked off the letters. It took forever but it was worth it and I didnt have to get metal shavings on the fresh paint later.

Thats pretty much it. I went very detail and masked off alot of small parts. Like around the plug holes, a few bolt holes for grounds etc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
black_krix_si said:
I did the valve cover on my b16 a few years back and it came out great.
I second that, it looks awesome! I'm a sucker for that shade of blue. Had a truck a few years ago in a similar color, really responded well to a polish and wax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
black_krix_si said:
Its all in the prep work.
As far as polishing up the letters and emblem on the VC after painting, I like using a sanding block and sand paper to scrub the paint off. For best results, wait at least 24 hrs before back sanding so the paint will be fully hardened.

And for paint choice, I've painted several valve covers with all different kinds/qualities of spray paint and never once had a problem with the heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,480 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info guys. So what grit sand paper should I start at? Ill take pictures tonight of my VC but its already to the bare metal. How much sanding should I do?**

**=this question will be better answered once I get the pic up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Once you've got all of the paint off, either use 500 grit or the Red 3M scouring pads to prep the metal for paint. Try and get every nook and cranny to a dull matte finish with the prep sanding.
Then hose it down with brake cleaner.

If you're using spray paint, just *lightly* dust the valve cover with the first coat of paint and let it sit for about 3-4 minutes so it'll tack up. You want this first coat light and sticky so the subsequent coats of paint build up easier without puddling or running.

Post pics when done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
GSRcrx had his valve cover powder coated and it looked beautiful. only thing is it cost around 75-80 dollars i think. so it might be more to go that route but man did it look good. i'll try to find the post and link u.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,480 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks. I think ill be doing this next week sometime as I hopefully will have some time off. Thanks for the info guys, and any additional will be that much more helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
I painted a valve cover last summer with the same basic procedure as black krix mentioned above, there is one component I used that he didnt, and so far its worked wonders(dropped a ratchet directly on the valve cover while changing plugs and not so much as a scratch).. Its a product called bulldog paint adhesive, you simply spray it on before you paint and let it dry. And its not just for valve covers, most body shops use it in regular paint work too..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
red89si said:
Its a product called bulldog paint adhesive
also, it is supposed to be great for bumpers and other flexible parts where it is harder to get the paint to stay. never used it myself, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,480 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ive been pretty sick latly and havnt had the time to get the needed equipment or sprays to start, but keep the good info comin guys! Ill get around to this one day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
next time youre at walmart, go to the automotive section and pick up a spray can of bulldog, its only 5 bux there, oreillys usually charges 6-7 bux for the same thing.
Its primarily used for plastic and flexible surfaces, but a friend of mine paints at a bodyshop and uses it on everything, he swears by it, dont get it in your hair or let somebody spray your hair with it, its a pretty wicked form of hairgel...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,047 Posts
You could take the easy route and have someone do it for you. There's a guy on ebay who does it. He sells you a professionally powder-coated valve cover + core charge. You send in your old one and he gives you some money back. They look awesome too. I might do that some day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
stickershop said:
joshman said:
Or have it professionaly powder coated.
Ya, but to get the stock finish, you'd have to have it textured somehow. I'm not sure how melting plastic powder is going to come out with that kind of finish.
You don't have to do anything to get it textured. You just purchase the correct powder for the finish desired. The oven will do the rest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
stickershop said:
And if you want it to look stock? (with the wrinkly paint) What are your options? Just VHT Krinkle Paint?
Theres a black valve cover wrinkle coat made by krylon that autozone sells for about 4 bux a can, Im actually prepping a D15B valve cover I got for free to see how it works...
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top