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I often park next to a rio-red early NSX in my same-colored CRX at work.

I've been wondering, with the heaviest steel-framed crx weighing in under 2200lbs it makes me wonder just what it was that made the NSX weigh so much more?

I would assume its all-aluminum chassis would make it quite light (though it is a bit wider and longer), and I cant imagine its engine/tranny being 600lbs more than a CRXs.

So where does the extra weight come from?
 

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fireant said:
I would assume its all-aluminum chassis would make it quite light (though it is a bit wider and longer), and I cant imagine its engine/tranny being 600lbs more than a CRXs.
You answered your question. The chassis is larger. Even though aluminum is lighter than steel, you have to use thicker pieces to maintain the same strength. You still get a weight savings, but with the larger chassis, it is going to be heavier than a CRX. In addition, the C30/32 series engines are much larger than our 4 cylinders, that would probably add a bit of weight as well. (maybe 100 - 200 lbs?)
 

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Yup, that's a big, long, wide car, size is a huge factor. I'm sure a "luxury supercar" like that has plenty of sound deadening materials, etc. as well so the ride is relatively quiet and the doors close with a nice solid sound. Also it probably has a lot of options and interior accoutrements that a CRX doesn't have that add some weight to the car, little things that add up.
 

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Remember, too, that when you add "just a bigger engine and transmission", you're not really adding just that. EVERYTHING associated with them is now bigger and heavier. That goes from the starter, alternator, usually even battery, to the motor mounts (which are probably fluid-filled in the NSX, if I were to make a guess... which I just did). Also, the bigger engine and transmission are spinning (usually) a bigger flywheel and clutch, transmitting the power through thicker (so heavier) half-shafts, spinning heavier-duty hubs, which carry bigger, heavier rotors, bigger (heavier) calipers, pads, and so on, all the way out to the 5-lug (instead of our four) wheels, which are usually 16, 17, or 18 inchers, or even more - and so, of course, heavier. And the big wheels are shod with big tires, which are - you guessed it - heavier.

And that's just the stuff on the mechanical end. Oh, figure in bigger radiators, probably a transmission oil cooler, extra plumbing for the cooling system (mid-engine, remember), and so on, and you see the weight savings really start to add up - to more weight!

I'd bet that the NSX, being a "luxury" sports car, also uses heavier glass all around, thicker carpet, and as mentioned in one of the other posts, more sound deadening materials.

When people call the NSX a lightweight sports car, they're comparing it to others within its genre; cars that typically come up in a comparison with the NSX are the Porsche 911 and Boxster, Toyota Supra, Nissan 300ZX (or 350Z now), and the Corvette. To some extent, lower-line Ferraris also get compared. Now, when thrown in with those cars (all of which, to the best of my knowledge, weigh in at 3200 lbs or more, and most tip the scales at 3500 lbs or better), the NSX *IS* a light car.

Make more sense now?

Mike
 
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