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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have several long distance friends that have been helpful with my first drum brake job, but this thing should have taken minutes instead of hours -- and I am still not done.

The reason I am doing this myself is that I am pretty cash poor now and figure that I should know how to do this anyway. Most experienced folks say this is not too bad a deal if you have done it a few times. They also warned that you ought to have someone show you the first time. That's why I need a local rexer. I can do this stuff but I would avoid all kinds of nonsense if I had help the first time.

Problem: Right rear drum locked up. I took the cover off the ebrake and the cable isn't slacked. So who knows? Helms manual offers no help.

So here are the screwups to date on this brake drum project:

1) Looking at the manual, I figure I am supposed to remove the dust cap and that big ass nut. After screwing with it for hours and only getting one side off, I called a buddy 180 miles away. "Why are you taking that nut off?" Thankfully he didn't laugh too hard. I clean the wound on my left palm that happened when I jammed a screwdriver into it trying to get the dust cover off. I can't get the brake dust, grease, and dirt out of it. Yeah, I didn't wear gloves.

2) Heeding the warning off others to do one side at a time so that you have a reference, I take off the left side drum with not too much beating. Right side is frozen and since I have to wait until my wife goes home so I can buy bolts to pull it off with, I decide to change the shoes on the left side. Did I bother to check them for wear first? Nope. Did I forget that I had a brake job three years ago before I wrecked the car and it sat for a year? Nope. So a couple of hours later all the parts are on the ground and when I pull out the new shoes, I notice that the old shoes have about as much pad left. Not only that but now a tension pin is now missing. :x

3) I take the drum to the auto parts store to find out which bolt size I need. Autozone dip uses a bunch of bolts and tells me 7mm X 1.0. I spend the next couple of hours trying to find a 7mm bolt that is long enough. No luck. I get suspicious and search HT. Sheeit, it is a 8mm X 1.5!

4) I can only find an 8mm bolt that is 45mm long. I bring it home, compare it to the drum depth. It looks like i isn't deep enough. Do I try it to see if it is? Nope. Do I look at the hub to notice that the bolt would push on the part that sits INSIDE the drum and not the acking plate? Nope. So after another round of hitting some of the more specialty hardware stores, I find a 90mm long bolt. Then when i try it I find that 45mm would have probably done the job.

I clean up the frozen side as much as possible without taking everything off. I tighten up the self-adjusting screw as much as possible. Looks like that may fix it. Who knows? When it self adjusts, it may just lock the sucka back up.

I quit at this point as I a cannot find the tension pin and have screwed up the U-clip. I am going to need to buy a hardware kit. Then I get to figure out how this jig saw goes back together WHILE trying to install it. One spring off and it all falls apart.

I really need a CRX buddy locally to show this crap to me. I guess I am getting an expensive and painful education, though.
 

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Charles,

Congratulations, you are following the Zen path to learning auto mechnics.
The journey is worth much more than the destination.

Reach out with your feelings. Meditate upon the flow of the design. Do not resist the engineering philosophy.

And buy yourself a factory service manual which will lay out the step by step directions to doing any job.

Scott
 

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Yeah.. isn't it FUN!! :p

Welcome to the wonderful world of D.I.Y.

Dont feel bad about it.. you are learning! and you will know those brakes inside and out when you finally get it right!

Frustrating? You Bet!! In the end though.. you will be better for it!

Trust me.. it took me a few weeks to pull my first engine! :shock:

later

Sneak
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
cbstd said:
And buy yourself a factory service manual which will lay out the step by step directions to doing any job.
I got one. It is still a steep learning curve. However, I agree, the journey is enjoyable. The best part is getting to buy new tools with the money I save over taking it to the dealership.
 

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if it makes you feel any better, the first time I replaced my drums, it was an all weekend affair.

I ended up smashing my wheel bearing. It twisted just slightly as I slid it back on, and then jammed itself. When I tried to slide it back off, the inner race stuck to my spindle, and split. Then, the assembly fell out of the drum, and the springs dislogged, SO, I had to start all over again.

At least I learned how to replace them, but by the time I need to do them again, I'll have forgotten everything :evil:
 

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Charles said:
cbstd said:
And buy yourself a factory service manual which will lay out the step by step directions to doing any job.
I got one. It is still a steep learning curve. However, I agree, the journey is enjoyable. The best part is getting to buy new tools with the money I save over taking it to the dealership.
Welcome to the Dark Side!!! I have cursed and kicked my way through quite a few fun "first-time-DIY" projects around my 'Rex: axles (only take about 20 minutes now, first one was 4 hours, done it three times due to bad motor mounts discovered after the second axle broke), disc brakes (haven't done the drums YET! Coming soon...), Oh...and the EVER-SO-FUN Alternator!

Man I can't wait to start cursing and kicking my car again this summer!
 

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cbstd said:
Charles,

Congratulations, you are following the Zen path to learning auto mechnics.
The journey is worth much more than the destination.

Reach out with your feelings. Meditate upon the flow of the design. Do not resist the engineering philosophy.

And buy yourself a factory service manual which will lay out the step by step directions to doing any job.

Scott
:shock: :? :( wehre you not hugged as a child? :twisted:
 

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shadowcrx said:
cbstd said:
Charles,

Congratulations, you are following the Zen path to learning auto mechnics.
The journey is worth much more than the destination.

Reach out with your feelings. Meditate upon the flow of the design. Do not resist the engineering philosophy.

And buy yourself a factory service manual which will lay out the step by step directions to doing any job.

Scott
:shock: :? :( wehre you not hugged as a child? :twisted:
He was raised by Monks, and we all know Monks don't hug! :wink:
 

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DIY wow it feels great when things go right but when things go wrong u turn into :twisted: no lie im a die hard DIY THe first time i topped out my rex i blew ever gastket but i didnt know this at the time. she wouldnt start woulding start. i itched my head and just said im rebuildin her first time ive ever rebuilt an engine but i was going to do it. 1 week later me still :twisted: got her put back together tring to start her wont start i thought to myself i did the timin right i did it right. i wasnt about to take it in the butt and tow it to a shop so i walked down the street to a neighbor who has a 12 sec nova and asked him for his timin gun. o man when i use her i coulndnt have been more off on timin. i was like 180 retarted on the crank like 180 retarted on the cam and then like 15 advanced on the dizzy i couldnt have felt more retarted. i was thinkin to my self how the hell did she stay together. after i got her timed right and she fired up at 3:30 am i felt like 1 mill bucks . after letting her run for about 2 hours i backed her out of the garage and drove her straight header to the only gas station in town that sells 100 octane out of the pump. i had to give my baby the best gas intown . sence then shes realy never done me wrong other than today when i tried another DIY job. Theres nothing better than Doing it Yourself!!!
 

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The journey is worth much more than the destination.
I like the way Shepherd Book put it in the short-lived series Firefly:

"The destination isn't important. How you get there is the worthier part."

:)

Mike

PS: Charles - Good luck on the brake job. Keep plugging away at it. I can relate; how the heck do you think I learned to work on Hondas? By being a poor slob who just didn't have a choice! It gets frustrating sometimes, but a good manual helps, and eventually it gets FUN. Well, maybe. At the least, it should be "not torture".
 

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Worth every penny...

FACTORY HONDA SERVICE MANUALS

HELMINC.COM

Contact Us
Address: 14310 Hamilton Ave.
Highland Park, MI 48203
Tel: (800) 782-4356
Fax: (313) 865-5927

For questions that need to be answered by a Helm customer service representative, please email us: [email protected].

To submit an order by phone call (800) 782-4356 or fax order to (313) 865-5927.

Customer Service hours are between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday.
 

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baker_jeff said:
shadowcrx said:
cbstd said:
Charles,

Congratulations, you are following the Zen path to learning auto mechnics.
The journey is worth much more than the destination.

Reach out with your feelings. Meditate upon the flow of the design. Do not resist the engineering philosophy.

And buy yourself a factory service manual which will lay out the step by step directions to doing any job.

Scott
:shock: :? :( wehre you not hugged as a child? :twisted:
He was raised by Monks, and we all know Monks don't hug! :wink:
I was raised by wolves. Which explains my social skills.

Acutally, dear old Dad was the orginal Hot Rodder: black leather jacket, ducktail haircut, pack of Pall Malls rolled up in his sleeve. That did not stop him from becoming an IBM data sytem designer and sales man. By day, white shirt/blue suit/wing tips. By night he was up to his elbows in grease wrenching on a variety of cars.

I grew up with a project car in the garage. But there is only so much an independantly minded young man is willing to learn from his father. Somethings you just have to learn on your own.

I subscribe to the Zen method of learnig auto mechanics. If you are truly interspective you will learn about yourself and your car at the same time.

Scott
 
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